Respecting your peers

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By: Mia Laube @mia_laube21 [Newspaper Editor]

By the time they reach high school, most students understand the concept of respecting adults and elders. Being polite, listening, and working hard are traits they must develop to become adults themselves. However, one thing they have not seemed to develop is respect for people in their own age group.

It’s hard to believe that kids think they don’t have to be nice to each other just because they are classmates. Remarks, drama, and being generally rude are traits one doesn’t want to be known for. This is how their generation is going to remember them as a person, even if they mature in adulthood.

It is not even big things like exclusion or bullying, but making catty remarks or thriving around constant drama and not knowing when to stop talking are signs of immaturity. In this time of our lives when we are in a rush to grow up and will be moving on to college soon, not having maturity is tough because it generally shows an unreadiness for the “real world.”

It is not hard to keep a nice and respectful environment around school. Not pushing or glaring in the halls but instead offering a smile, even to those who aren’t friends; not saying the first comment on one’s mind but instead only giving positive feedback to others; not trashing a peer on social media for more likes and attention but instead showing appreciation; these are a few non-difficult steps to be taken to show more kindness and eliminate hostility.

Not everyone creates issues, and there is no rule saying we all have to mature and grow up as soon as we can. Still, as we walk through this part of our lives, making positive relationships with classmates can make the memories feel sweeter, and the regrets less. Kindness and respect are a very important skill set in a social setting, no matter where one goes in life.

In the long run, those who can spread respect will not only gain it back from their age group, but from adults, as it shows inside and out. One only has to go back and think about the things they’ve been taught since kindergarten- treat others the way you want to be treated, and a smile goes a long way. Then, even though high school and college can be difficult, everyone can support each other all the way until we have to walk across the stage together.

The classroom is where respect starts, and where lifelong relationships are built when peers are kind and thoughtful with their daily interactions.

The classroom is where respect starts, and where lifelong relationships are built when peers are kind and thoughtful with their daily interactions.

 

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