Childhood Cancer

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Bri Fentress, '20, who had cancer as a child, works on her homework during class.

Bri Fentress, ’20, who had cancer as a child, works on her homework during class.


Most times when one thinks of cancer, they think of an adult in the battle. However, for many families, a sibling, son or daughter is fighting every day for the next. According to CureSearch for Childhood Cancer each day, 43 children are diagnosed with cancer and one of eight do not make it. Every year, there are 40,000 kids diagnosed with an average age of just six. In the last 20 years, there have been only three medications approved for child use. Later on in life, 60% of childhood cancer survivors suffer from late effects. These include infertility, heart failure, and secondary cancers.

Bri Fentress, ’20, had a germ cell teratoma cancer as a child. “I had it when I was one to three years old,” she said. This took a toll on her friends and family. “They were scared for me because I was so little.” Many families go through what the Fentress family did and many kids as little as Bri was, have cancer today.

People may wonder what they can do to help with research for childhood cancer. On curesearch.org, you can donate, fund, and learn of stories of kids and adults who have defeated cancer. You can also learn more statistics of childhood cancer and of the various different types of cancer.

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